Atlas of foodborne infections
transmitted by contaminated food and water

Atlas of Patogens Contents Information sources Glossary Administration

Shigella

CZ: shigela (čti šigela)
EN: shigela

Occurrence:
Fruits and Vegetables
Water and Beverages
Meat and Meat Products
Milk and Milk Products
Soft Cheeses
Hard Cheeses
Delicatessen


Category:
Bacteria


Foodborne Disease:
Untitled document

Source: Spread when human carrier with poor sanitary habits handles liquid or moist food that is not thoroughly cooked afterwards. Shigella multiply at room temperature. Susceptible foods include poultry, milk and dairy products, salads, and other foods that require a lot of mixing and handling and no further heat treatment.<br />Symptoms (after eating): Onset: 1-7 days; abdominal pain, diarrhoea, fever, sometimes vomiting, and blood, pus or mucus in stool; lasts 5-6 days. Most serious in infants, the elderly, infirm, or immune-compromised.<br />Prevention: Practice good personal hygiene and sanitary food handling (wash hands thoroughly and frequently). Also, avoid leaving perishable foods unrefrigerated over 2 hours and cook food thoroughly (reheat to at least 75 degrees C). Do not prepare food when ill with diarrhoea or vomiting.<br />Untitled document<br /><br />The Shigella germ is actually a family of bacteria that can cause diarrhoea in humans. There are several different kinds of Shigella bacteria: Shigella sonnei, also known as "Group D" Shigella, a second type, Shigella flexneri, or "group B" Shigella. One type found in the developing world, Shigella dysenteriae type 1 causes deadly epidemics there.<br /><br />Most infected people with Shigella develop diarrhoea, fever, and stomach cramps starting a day or two after they are exposed to the bacterium. The diarrhoea is often bloody. Shigellosis usually resolves in 5 to 7 days. In some persons, especially young children and the elderly, the diarrhoea can be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalised.<br /><br />A severe infection with high fever may also be associated with seizures in children less than 2 years old. Some persons who are infected may have no symptoms at all, but may still pass the Shigella bacteria to others. Determining that Shigella is the cause of the illness depends on laboratory tests that identify Shigella in the stools of an infected person. Shigellosis can usually be treated with antibiotics. Antidiarrhoeal agents such as loperamide (Imodium) or diphenoxylate with atropine (Lomotil) are likely to make the illness worse and should be avoided.<br /><br />Persons with diarrhoea usually recover completely, although it may be several months before their bowel habits are entirely normal. About 3% o


Description:
Untitled document

Source: Spread when human carrier with poor sanitary habits handles liquid or moist food that is not thoroughly cooked afterwards. Shigella multiply at room temperature. Susceptible foods include poultry, milk and dairy products, salads, and other foods that require a lot of mixing and handling and no further heat treatment.
Symptoms (after eating): Onset: 1-7 days; abdominal pain, diarrhoea, fever, sometimes vomiting, and blood, pus or mucus in stool; lasts 5-6 days. Most serious in infants, the elderly, infirm, or immune-compromised.
Prevention: Practice good personal hygiene and sanitary food handling (wash hands thoroughly and frequently). Also, avoid leaving perishable foods unrefrigerated over 2 hours and cook food thoroughly (reheat to at least 75 degrees C). Do not prepare food when ill with diarrhoea or vomiting.
Untitled document

The Shigella germ is actually a family of bacteria that can cause diarrhoea in humans. There are several different kinds of Shigella bacteria: Shigella sonnei, also known as "Group D" Shigella, a second type, Shigella flexneri, or "group B" Shigella. One type found in the developing world, Shigella dysenteriae type 1 causes deadly epidemics there.

Most infected people with Shigella develop diarrhoea, fever, and stomach cramps starting a day or two after they are exposed to the bacterium. The diarrhoea is often bloody. Shigellosis usually resolves in 5 to 7 days. In some persons, especially young children and the elderly, the diarrhoea can be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalised.

A severe infection with high fever may also be associated with seizures in children less than 2 years old. Some persons who are infected may have no symptoms at all, but may still pass the Shigella bacteria to others. Determining that Shigella is the cause of the illness depends on laboratory tests that identify Shigella in the stools of an infected person. Shigellosis can usually be treated with antibiotics. Antidiarrhoeal agents such as loperamide (Imodium) or diphenoxylate with atropine (Lomotil) are likely to make the illness worse and should be avoided.

Persons with diarrhoea usually recover completely, although it may be several months before their bowel habits are entirely normal. About 3% o


Pictures:

Dif.dg.of Salmonella and Shigella from E.coli
Source: eosin methylene blue (EMB), MacConkey, ENDO, Hektoen enteric (HE) agar and Salmonella-Shigella (SS)
Shigella
Source: MacConkey Agar Plates - Bacterial colonies
Shigella
Source: Shigella colonies under the microscope
Shigella
Source: Shigella in detail (in orange)
Shigella
Source: Shigella infection in gut

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